How Do You Prefer Your Skull?

Published November 6, 2014 by FunkyWolfCafe

a1096_400wSugar Skull Tradition

Sugar art was brought to the New World by Italian missionaries in the 17th century. The first Church mention of sugar art was from Palermo at Easter time when little sugar lambs and angels were made to adorn the side altars in the Catholic Church.

Mexico, abundant in sugar production and too poor to buy fancy imported European church decorations, learned quickly from the friars how to make sugar art for their religious festivals. Clay molded sugar figures of angels, sheep and sugar skulls go back to the Colonial Period 18th century. Sugar skulls represented a departed soul, had the name written on the forehead and was placed on the home ofrenda or gravestone to honor the return of a particular spirit. Sugar skull art reflects the folk art style of big happy smiles, colorful icing and sparkly tin and glittery adornments. Sugar skulls are labor intensive and made in very small batches in the homes of sugar skull makers. These wonderful artisans are disappearing as fabricated and imported candy skulls take their place.folter_a1093_skull_stars_folter_wallet_1_original

There is nothing as beautiful as a big, fancy, unusual sugar skull!  Of course, skulls come in all shapes, and sizes but nevertheless, have been featured in art for many, many centuries.  It has been a fascination used in art, tattoos, and even used to mark dangerous chemicals.

Rock the skull at funkywolfcafe.storenvy.com

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